On Shipportport Island

A few posts ago, I showed some photographs from the walk toward Shippingport Island. Finally, here are some photographs from the island itself.

The town of Shippingport is long gone. Most of the island is used by the McAlpine Locks and Dam and the Ohio Falls Generating Station.

A small fishing area is the only publicly-accessible area on the island today.  They've dumped sand in the wooded area. (I imagine it would be a mud/mosquito pit without it.) And much of the shore is large gravel that was probably brought in. But the authentic-looking part of the shore is clay, which is broken into an interesting reticulated pattern. At least I thought the pattern was interesting. But I'm no islandologist. Maybe you are.

Shippingport Island
Louisville, Ky.
October, 2015

Shippingport Island
Louisville, Ky.
October, 2015

Shippingport Island
Louisville, Ky.
October, 2015

The wooded area obviously floods regularly. You can see plenty of mud and river trash high in the trees. I don't know whether or not the remains of the town of Shippingport were deliberately removed. But even if not, the river would surely have removed them by now.

Shippingport Island
Louisville, Ky.
October, 2015

Shippingport Island
Louisville, Ky.
October, 2015

From the most southern bit of the fishing area, you have a great view of the back of the hydroelectric plant. Construction on the plant started in 1923. I've read that it has been upgraded to use very modern and efficient turbines. But it still looks like something built in the 20's from back here.

Shippingport Island
Louisville, Ky.
October, 2015

Shippingport Island
Louisville, Ky.
October, 2015

These frames are from a very expired roll of HP5+ shot with a Color-Skopar 21mm f/4.0 on a Bessa R4A and stand developed in R09 (Rodinal) for an hour.

Some Ordinary Photographs from Roll 20160411-00

For several years, I almost always had my tiny Olympus XA rangefinder on me, especially if I wasn't carrying something larger. Those days are over, as my XA has died. (It acts as if the self-timer is stuck on. The Internet tells me that this is a common failure of one of its ICs.) But I have a few rolls shot with it still waiting to be processed.

This roll was some aged Ilford HP5+, from a stash given to me by a photojournalist friend who has long since joined the digital age.

It was stand developed in R09 (Rodinal) 1+100 for 60 minutes.

Elizabethtown, Ky.

On the square.
Elizabethtown, Ky.

I have no idea where this was.

Baptism at the Bridge Community Church
Elizabethtown, Ky.

Bikes, Blues, & BBQ
Elizabethtown, Ky.

Lucky Bamboo on the back of my toilet
Elizabethtown, Ky.

 

Waterfront
Louisville, Ky.

 

Kentucky Science Center
Louisville, Ky.

Couple of n'er-do-wells at the Lousville Zoo.
Louisville, Ky.

Roll 20160410-00

The meta paragraph. It's still unclear what this blog is about. But I felt like that post about a roll of film came out pretty well. So I'm going to try that again. The roll is an interesting quanta of imagery. And it gives me an excuse to ignore that "only show your best work" advice that everyone is so insistent about. 

The introductory bit. Last summer and fall I spent many Friday afternoons wandering around downtown Louisville and the adjacent neighborhoods. The city seemed dead on this particular October day. So I cut my usual circuit short and ended up heading south along the Louisville Loop trail instead. 

The tech paragraph, in case Mick reads this. Hi Mick. The M3 was loaded with Legacy Pro 100 (off-brand Neopan 100 Acros.) I was using the old collapsible Summicron 50. While I do have a more modern and scary-sharp Summicron, the old collapsible version feels so right (and compact) on the M3. It looks like I had the orange filter fitted. Souped this in R09 (Rodinal) 1+50 for 13:30. I was carrying another camera with a wider lens too. But that's another post, maybe.

The paragraph about the public art. Some public art popped up along the waterfront last year. (Hey, you'll never guess what the piece constructed from stacked barrels is named: Barrel Stack.) Good to see that wasteland underneath and beside I-64 put to some use. As usual, my photos lie: I saw the public engage with these installations pretty regularly. They only look absurd and sparse because, well, it's a thing I do.

The bit about the bridge. The path passes by the Fourteen Street Bridge, a railroad bridge built in 1868 and still in operation. The first image here shows the lift span of the bridge, with one of its huge counterweights visible. I've only caught it in action a couple of times. It's very cool to watch from upstream. But the sounds of the span moving are the most interesting part when you're this close up.

A comment about the photographs which I did not make here. There's a well-known and established homeless camp across the path from this bridge. I've passed through and exchanged greetings. But I would need to spend many hours there before feeling like I had the social currency needed to successfully pull out a camera.

The paragraph explaining why there are pictures of trains and stuff. Farther south, the path runs along the railroad and the backside of some Portland industrial areas. The path crosses the tracks at one point. And if the train has stopped on that crossing, you either have to go back where you came from, or continue along beside the tracks where you probably shouldn't really be. The rail workers I ran into seemed to understand my plight and didn't complain about me continuing alongside the stopped train. 

About the Shippingport Island bridge. Before the McAlpine Locks, there's a bridge over to Shippingport Island. I like the nice clean lines of this bridge. It's not really a suspension bridge, but it is dressed up to look like one. And it provides a great view down onto the locks.

The awkward closing paragraph.  Maybe you thought there'd be some photographs from Shippingport Island next. Sorry, different roll. I walked back through Portland. Again, different cameras. But here are a couple of bits of the flood wall along Northwestern Parkway that caught my eye.

Optional Google Missions.

  • Once upon a time, Portland was a city in its own right. The history of Louisville, Portland, and the Louisville and Portland Canal is good reading.
  • Do you know about the town of Shippingport, Ky.? Almost none of it remains. See also, Corn Island. 
  • If you're not a local, maybe you don't know about Louisville's Great Flood of 1937. Even just Google image search on it is worthwhile.

A Rough Roll of Film

Hey, look at this mess I made. 

I hadn't developed a roll of film in almost two years. Been shooting it some. But it'd just been piling up in the fridge. I decided to fix that last night. And just to make it interesting, I picked an old roll of T-MAX p3200 out of the fridge to start with. This stuff does not have a long shelf life. And the refrigerator doesn't stop it from fogging from background radiation. 

So I had low expectations for this roll all along. It looks like it sat in my R4A for months while I used it for non-critical odds and ends. So clearly I'm just going to file the negatives away and never do anything with them. I would certainly never put them on the web for everyone to see. Except maybe that's what I'll do.


Each summer, downtown Elizabethtown hosts Cruisin' The Heartland. There are approximately a million cars there, and almost as many people. And the temperature usually is of almost as many degrees. It's a great place to get lots of pictures of your family looking at cars. Or, you know, to mess around with some ridiculous expired film.

Cruisin' The Heartland
Elizabethtown, KY
June, 2011

Cruisin' The Heartland
Elizabethtown, KY
June, 2011

Cruisin' The Heartland
Elizabethtown, KY
June, 2011


When my brother's family is in town, we always end up splashing around in a creek. 

Elizabethtown, Ky.
July, 2011

Elizabethtown, Ky.
July, 2011

I don't remember any trips to the emergency room. From that I infer that I just liked the curve of that barbed wire and that I wasn't documenting a family tragedy.


I like my wife and pictures of my wife. She hates pictures of my wife and my taking pictures of my wife. This conflict is not easily resolved. This is an image of that unresolved conflict, and also of my wife.


We went to Newport/Cincinnati for Fall Break in 2011. I have some really nice memories of that trip. I have some pretty good photographs from that trip too. These are not them. Except the alligator one. I kind of like that one, sandpaper grain and all. 

Also, note that the Cincinnati sky does not really have sprocket hole streaks in it. I may have under-agitated this roll a little. There are signs of uneven development all over the place.

Newport, Ky.
October, 2011

Newport, Ky.
October, 2011

Cincinnati Zoo
October, 2011

Newport Aquarium
October, 2011


And finally, once upon a time there were some balloons outside a pizza place. 

 

Elizabethtown, Ky.
2011

 

Transition

Hi there.

Last month I stopped posting images daily. At the same time, I wrote a too-long post about how the single images is devalued now that most of us consume hundreds of images via our screens every day. I have not shared that post because it sounds like sour grapes. And it sounds like sour grapes mostly because it is sour grapes.

So onward and upward. But not daily. Expect more words. Expect groups of images. But don't expect them very often.

Elizabethtown, Ky.
July, 2015